Archive for October 2014

Thirsty? A City of 20 Million People on the Verge of Running Out of Water

Oct 30th, 2014 | By
[Photo:By Francisco Anzola (Flickr: Sao Paulo Skyline) [CC-BY-2.0 (], via Wikimedia Commons]

By Suzanne York, For several years now, the topic that water would be the next oil has been bandied about, implying that water would be as valuable as fossil fuels. That day of reckoning may be coming sooner than many people think.  Last week, Reuters reported that the city of São Paulo – South
[continue reading…]

The Earth is Big, Humans are Small

Oct 22nd, 2014 | By
[image credit:]

By Suzanne York, The theme of this past weekend’s Bioneers Summit Conference was “revolution from the heart of nature,” but more than that, it was also that land and life are sacred. If you aren’t familiar with Bioneers, it is an annual conference that just celebrated its 25th year. Attendees are referred to as
[continue reading…]

Where Do We Go From Here?

Oct 16th, 2014 | By
[image credit:]

By Suzanne York, The stock market is up and down, oil companies are making record profits, there is a growing gap between the have’s and the have nots, a large number of people take anti-depressants, and the environment is increasingly being degraded.  Do we accept this as the way it is, or is there
[continue reading…]

The Struggle for Rights & Dignity

Oct 13th, 2014 | By
[photo credit:]

By Suzanne York, Last week, on International Day of the Girl– a day recognized by the UN “to help galvanize worldwide enthusiasm for goals to better girls’ lives” – the Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to two people working on behalf of children’s rights. Malala Yousafzai, the teenager shot by the Taliban two years
[continue reading…]

A Living Planet, But for How Long?

Oct 3rd, 2014 | By
[photo: World Wildlife Fund]

By Suzanne York, The Living Planet Report 2014, an analysis of undertaken by World Wildlife Fund, the London Zoological Society, and a few other groups, just reported sobering and disturbing news:  the world is losing more species than originally thought, with the state of global wildlife populations halved in 40 years. The opening paragraph
[continue reading…]